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to bar u.s. human rights abuses. some say this is all evidence of a new cold war. stephen cohen is a professor at nyu and william brodeur was an ambassador in russia, and was his former employer and he is, of course, one of the biggest proponents behind the magnitsky act. welcome to you both. >> thank you. >> william, explain the importance of the act from your point of view? >> very simply, it is a piece of legislation which is sort of designed for the modern day problems of what's going on in russia. in russia, you have a regime which is basically out to steal as much money as possible from their own people. in response to that, when people try to stop it in any way, like sergei magnitsky, they get killed. what the act does is it creates consequences for the corrupt murdering kelp to crates running russia today and creates consequences outside of russia by banning their visas and freezing their assets in america. >> steve cohen, you disagree with the magnitsky act. do you wish congress hadn't passed it? >> i do for many reasons, but as you said in your introduction i think mos
cold war. stephen cohen is a professor at nyu and william browder was his former employer and he is, of course, one of the biggest proponents behind the magnitski act. william, explain the importance of the act from your point of view? >> very simply, it is a piece of legislation which is sort of designed for the modern day problems of what's going on in russia. in russia, you have a regime which is basically out to steal as much money as possible from their own people. when people try to stop it in any way, like sergeis magnitsky, they get killed. the corrupt running russia today and creates consequences outside of russia by banning their visas and freezing their assets in america. >> steve cohen, you disagree with the magnitsky act. >> i do for many reasons, but as you said in your introduction i think moscow and washington are sliding into a new cold war, which would be very bad for national security and the magnitsky act further poisons the relationship. mr. browder is right to a certain extent, but not quite as simple as he says. even though this may be this act just a lot of w
has new details on steve cohen. melissa: you are always controversial. charlie: here is what is interesting about steve cohen. in february, as they see faces a window of redemptions. here is what we know. fac officials are screaming to prevent massive reductions. they are currently contacting and holding one-on-one meetings with investors. they are essentially saying that despite everything, the investigation -- a wells notice has been given. despite all of that, they think that steve cohen we'll be okay. they may get a large fine. they think they are facing charges. they will not be indicted. it will not be a criminal case. keep your money with us. the bottom line is this, you do not know until february. investors essentially hate this type of controversy. some very large investors have put holds on the stocks. i can also tell you, steve cohen and these guys are very aggressive. they are out there trying to get large investors to stay with it. they will come out after the story. these are different one-on-one meetings. this is crisis mode. they think there is a very good lik
a public health emergency. elizabeth cohen joins us now. what do health officials mean when they use the word epidemic? >> it gets very technical. i'll boil it down here. basically, people are getting sick and dying from the flu in certain numbers. when those numbers get high enough, we call it an epidemic. i personally don't really care that much about that word. i'll tell you why. the flu season nearly always reaches epidemic levels. even if it's just like a moderate plain old, you know, normal season. so i think we shouldn't get focused too much on that word. we instead should focus on what we're seeing here which is what can you do to avoid getting the flu which is getting a flu shot and doing things like washing your hands and staying away from people who look sick. john? >> it doesn't feel like just a normal flu season here. i have to tell you. a lot of people sick here in the office. a lot of people sick where i live. governor cuomo declared a public health emergency. so since we're talking about terminology, what does that mean? >> let me go back to what you said before. this
he'll be sworn in as secretary of state replacing hillary clinton. william cohen will replace kerry as an interim secretary up till a hearing in june. his confirmation hearing to replace defense secretary leon panetta begins today and his biggest critics will be his fellow republicans. susan mcginnis is in washington with the latest. susan, good morning. >> good morning, anne-marie. yeah. headachele will not get the smooth ride that john kerry got on his pass to secretary of state. haggle will face critics who have called him everything from anti-israel to anti-gay to anti-green. this is the first time he addresses those criticisms at a hearing that is critical to determining whether he becomes the next secretary of defense. chuck hagel, a former republican senator from nebraska should not expect a friendly reception on capitol hill this morning. >> president obama should choose someone else to lead the pentagon. >> reporter: texas senator john cornyn laid out the case on wednesday saying hagel is tough on israel and soft on iran. >> he simply does not understan
clinton. william cohen will replace kerry until an election in june. that probably won't happen to chuck hagel. his confirmation hearing to replace defense secretary leon panetta begins today and his biggest critics will be his fellow republicans. susan mcginnis is in washington with the latest. susan, good morning. >> good morning, anne-marie. chuck hagel will not get the smooth ride that john kerry did. they even called him ents from anti-israel to anti-gay to anti-green. this is the first time he addresses those criticisms at a hearing that is critical to whether he becomes the next secretary of defense. chuck naegele, a former republican senator from nebraska should not expect a friendly reception on capitol hill this morning. >> president obama should choose someone else to lead the pentagon. >> reporter: he laid out the case on wednesday saying hagel is tough on israel, soft on iran. >> he simply does not understand the true basis of the u.s./israel alliance and he's the same person who suggests united states might be able to live with a nuclear iran. >> some well funded groups hav
'm elizabeth cohen, and i hope this hour makes you an empowered patient. >> headline makers. >> this is more important than any election. >> i was the perfect candidate. >> what is mitt romney isn't the best person? >> it is ridiculously easy for someone to purchase a gun. >> do you think that homo sexuality is a sin? >> i think it is unnatural. >> did you wake up this morning and have a quick, you know? >> i probably d id. >> "piers morgan tonight -- the news makers" starts now. >>> good evening. one of the great things about my job is that every night i get to sit down with movers and shakers. the men and women at the center of the biggest stories of the year. the world leaders, lawmakers, celebrities. and people who never expected to find themselves in the spotlight. what do they have in common? they're all utterly fascinating. tonight you'll hear from some of my favorite guests. we'll begin with the big man himself, new jersey governor, chris christie. in the wake of the superstorm sandy, he found himself in a bit of political hot water for making nice with president obama. >> good eveni
cohen, and i hope this hour makes you an empowered patient. >>> do you trust ahmadinejad. >> on this i don't. >> if the president didn't know exactly what happened, he sure as hell should have. >> candidates? >> i was the perfect candidate for america. >> what if mitt romney isn't the best person? >> the idea that somehow making a business profitable is different than helping people is really a foreign idea. >> and more. >> it's ridiculously easy for someone to purchase a gun. >> do you think homosexuality is a sin? >> i think that it's -- it's -- it's unnatural. >> did you wake up this morning and have a quick, you know? >> i probably did. probably did. >> "piers morgan tonight -- the news makers" starts now. >>> good evening. one of the great things about my job is that every night i get to sit down with movers and shakers. the men and women at the center of the biggest stories of the year. the world leaders, lawmakers, celebrities. and people who never expected to find themselves in the spotlight. what do they have in common? they're all utterly fascinating. tonight you'll hear from
again. like hagel, william cohen was a republican senator before he was bill clinton's secretary of defense. >> i think he'll face the same challenge in terms of people on the democratic side saying, wait, we have some pretty talented people that are -- could step in at a moment's notice and fill that spot. and the republicans will say, why are you helping out a democratic administration? >> reporter: one key republican already is challenging hagel. >> i am concerned about many of the comments that he made and has made, like reference to a jewish lobby, which i don't believe exists, i believe a pro-israel lobby exists. >> others insist hagel is not anti-israel. >> he belongs to a sort of tough minded -- in this case republican view of israel. that in fact accepts the reality that while the united states and israel are very close allies and will remain close allies their views on every issue cannot be expected to coincide. >> reporter: and critics in the gay and lesbian community have turned around their opposition to hagel. in 1998, hagel opposed james hormel an openly gay man to
is a lot safer. our senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen joins me now to explain. what are we talking about in terms of rules? you think they should be there, wouldn't you? >> you would think they definitely should have already been there and safety advocates have been begging for these for years and thrilled the fda doing the basic things. better measures to keep animals out of fields where crops are growing because what they do in fields? poop in fields. we don't want that. better rules to get farm workers to wash their hands and the last one, little gross but i have to say it. okay? got to say it. which is, port-a-potties for the work earls because when they don't have them, what do they do? >> come on. no way, elizabeth. that's not already a regulation? >> no, no. there aren't strict rules like the rules doing here. again, you can see why safety advocates so frustrated because some of the things are so basic. and they're hoping these will be fully implemented. we have done the segments, peanuts, spinach. they seem to go on and on. >> in fact, i was going to bring that up.
by the last two democratic presidents. william cohen, and bob gates, re-appointed by president obama in 2009. and chuck hagel is a republican senator from nebraska. the republican committee is not jumping up and down celebrating. today, they released a statement about serious concerns that hagel has taken on a range of critical national security issues. republican senator graham got even more specific. >> chuck hagel, if confirmed to be secretary of defense would be the most antagonistic secretary of defense towards israel in our nation's history. he said you should negotiate with iran, sanctions won't work, that israel must negotiate with hamas, he has long cut his ties with the republican party. this is an in-your-face nomination by the president, to those of us that support. >> he means they have this to say about the conservative movement, america, the next chapter. chuck hagel writes, so why did we invade iraq? i believe it is the triumph, arrogance and incompetent that took america into this war of choice. chuck hagel, it should be said did not begin his career as a foreign policy apos
-old boy is wondering how this common treatable virus could take the life of their son. elizabeth cohen is joining us. she spent the morning with the family. elizabeth, how did this happen? >> reporter: wolf, it was such an emotional morning. i'm in front of the church that the family attends. mack was 17. that personified who he was. as you said, perfectly healthy. on december 21st he started feeling sick, a headache, a little bit tired. he had a fever but really no big deal and he was better in about two days and he then he felt fine for a while. and then a couple days later he started feeling bad again. his parents took him to a local hospital in the rural area they were in and they said he's got the flu and his kidneys are failing. they said, we have to get him to a bigger hospital. they put him on a helicopter and this is what max said to his mother as he was getting on the helicopter. >> one of the last coherent things he said, he looked at me and tears were rolling down his face. >> he was scared. >> he said, mom, i'm scared. i said, i know, buddy. i am, too. he said, mom, it's g
israeli prime minister ariel sharon is active. coming up next, elizabeth cohen explains what this could possibly mean. red lobster's 30 shrimp. wow, that's a lot of shrimp. [ male announcer ] it's red lobster's 30 shrimp! for $11.99 pair any two shrimp selections on one plate! like mango jalapeÑo shrimp and parmesan crunch shrimp. just $11.99. offer ends soon! i'm ryon stewart, and i sea food differently. just $11.99. offer ends soon! ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. [ male announcer ] engine light on? come to meineke now for a free code scan read and you'll say...my money. my choice. my meineke. >>> after seven years in a coma, former world leader is now showing signs of brain activity. ariel sharon became prime minister of israel back in 2001. he was a major player in the 2003 talks, called for a palestinian state, but then in 2006 he suffered a massive stroke and brain hemorrhage that put him in a vegetative state. well, today his doctors say that sharon appeared to respond to his son's voice
to get him confirmed? joining us is william cohen, a republican, i should point out, a former republican senator who bill clinton brought in. to bring a republican into his cabinet. you're the clear predicate for what the president -- this president, is trying to do with chuck hagel. what about chuck hagel and all the criticisms of past positions on iraq on the surge, his relationship with john mccain, obviously a troubling factor in terms of mccain's response. >> he is well quadfied. i have known him for years. the president has known him for years. he is entitled to have the people he wants for his cabinet, unless there's? fundamental character flaw or policy difference which would make that person unqualified. i think you have to start with that premise, and i think you start with that premise, then you will not find the disqualifying factors there. chuck hagel is well known to the president. he is very, very well founded in foreign policy, security policy. he is a substantive individual, serious-minded, tough-minded, and blunt. >> is he tough enough to cut the pentagon budget where y
, as richard cohen notes in "the washington post" nothing hagel has said about israel is not said in the israeli press on a daily basis. trust me, by the "wall street journal" standards israeli media would be deeply anti-semitic. lost perhaps in the discussion over hagel's position on israel is one of the main reasons he was nominated in the first place. >> most importantly, chuck knows that war is not an abstraction. he knows that sending young americans to fight and bleed in the dirt and mud, that's something we only do when it's absolutely necessary. >> a decorated war veteran reportedly requested to be sent to vietnam. hagel spoke to the library of congress in 2002 about how his military service had informed his world view. >> someone needs to represent that perspective in our government as well. the people in washington make the policy, but it's the little guys who come back in the body bag. >> as president obama attempts to put his next cabinet together, republicans seem to have developed an acute case of goldilocks syndrome. susan rice was too much of a loyalist, and republ
. for the record redoing third event is coming near. >> and also eliot cohen is in raise the intellectual godfather of this book. his book says syrian command. his book supreme command is the best single thing ever written on how president should talk to the military. >> fantastic. autonomy said that. >> inÉs said. [laughter] >> my question coming out of the strategicprogram is two pronged mlb on this i have your book yet, so i hope you have a nerdy answer this. but the very well-publicized job done in afghanistan appeared to asia, what gives you hope when it comes to future generalship and what makes you despair? >> second part is easier to answer. a lot of things make me despair. what gives me hope that it's going to some perverse, but it's not. the defense budget is going to be cut and let us cut as the british famously said we have no money anymore, so now we must need. we have a military that is at a fire hose of money turned on the last 10 years and intelligence community community as well. they were basically given money and told her to spend it through the we have a generation of officers
william cohen. if you remember, a republican who served under the president -- democratic administration of president clinton. now, if people here in the building say, look, you know, chuck hagel would be fine for us, including military uniformed service members because they understand, as you just pointed out, that the white house is going to be pulling the strings, turning the screws no matter who is the secretary of defenses. republican or democrat. i do want to set the record straight a little bit on this debate over the surge. now, senator hagel in the confirmation hearing said that 1,200 americans were killed during the 18-month surge operation. that's true. 1,200 americans died, but the actual number of combat deaths was 942. what's important to point out is that the 12 months before the surge began the total number of service members killed in iraq was 820. now, this is the most important figure i think if you are going to argue was the surge a success or not? that is the fact that the 12-month period following the surge operation there were 313 american deaths and the next year
to the clinton administration when president clinton invited william cohen, a republican to be defense secretary. then the obama administration, president obama asked robert gates, a republican to be defense secretary. then there was leon panetta. and now another republican, chuck hagel. what's wrong with democrats being defense secretary? >> right. actually, just as an historical footnote, roberts used to be a republican. you know, i think that there's a sort of feeling that each one of these can be justified. i think president clinton and cohen had a good relationship, as does president obama and senator hagel. in gates' instance, that made a lot of sense. so much was going on that you didn't want to have an immediate change in the defense. but that is true, that it looks like democrats always want to appoint republican secretaries of defense. also if you look at the history of the independent councils, they have almost all been republicans. and as a democrat i sometimes get frustrated, too. we can't find an independent council in our own party. i can understand the frustration but the preside
the playing field? >> for us it's always about what's in folks' hearts. we have cohen who gets an a on our report card, and we have a new senator like tim scott who is black gets an f every year. when i look at senator scott, i'm very glad that going into the 150th celebration, if you will. of the eman pags prok clags we have one black senator. we should have at least 10. when i look at him, you know, i say quite frankly what wuch my old coaches said about me in a sport i wasn't so good aat. he has nothing but potential. there's nothing but room to improve. we would hope that he would not continue to get fs on the naacp report card? >> is that because he's a republican or what's behind it? >> no. we have republicans that believe in civil rights. unfortunately, he's not one of them, and unfortunately his party as you know has really gone after so-called rhinos as they call them, these republican whoe believe in civil rights again and again. so, you know, for instance, you take senator specter there recently. he was very good on the same sorts of justice issues i was talking about. you know,
to the hospital. our senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen joins us by phone from louisville, texas. we have you on the phone because we know you're working on a flu story about kids. give us a preview. >> it's a terrible story of a completely healthy 17-year-old boy who got the flu, you know, kids get the flu, it happens, but it did not, he got very sick, very quickly and unfortunately, he ended up passing away, and this is what sometimes happens with kids. kids can look completely fine, and in less than 24 hours, or about 24 hours later that child is on a respirator in the intensive care unit, and a lot of these kids are just completely healthy kids with no underlying health problems and we don't know why most kids are okay with the flu. they're sick for a little while and get better. some of them die, we just don't know why. >> is it too late to get a flu vaccine to protect our kids, to protect ourselves? >> it isn't too late. that's one of two things i'll tell parents to do, to be empowered parents. this is so crucial. one, get your child the flu shot. we heard that people are still
autism lost their symptoms as they grew older. senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen here to talk to me about this study. first, just explain the study. >> it is fascinating because it turns conventional wisdom on its head. doctors thought you can't outgrow autism once you're diagnosed, that's it. you have it. these researchers found 34 kids who were diagnosed with autism by good doctors who know what they're doing as very young kids before the age of 5, and then they -- years later when they looked at them, they didn't have any signs of autism. they were examined and the signs were gone. >> so how is this even possible? >> a couple of things going on. they found in some ways this group of kid had somewhat milder autism to begin with, that's one thing. it could also have something to do with the early intervention that these kids got, some of the training and the schooling and what have you, the therapy these kids got. and it also might have something to do with the children's individual brains. maybe there was something about their brains. and researchers have told me, you know,
a tough l.a. cop who takes on notorious mob boss, mickey cohen. >> nobody will ever know what we've done. no medals. no promotion. but i'm here to tell you, there's death in it, waiting for the man who hesitates. right now, our only advantage is that he won't know who we are. so, i have only one rule in this outfit. leave these at home. we're not solving a case here. we're going to war. >> guess some trouble's coming with josh brolin right there. >> we're going to war. i'll i see when i look at that, is a guy that had to get up at 4:30 in the morning and workout. and after work, had to workout. and had to look like that. like clint eastwood. >> i love the look. you did say, and i read this, you felt a real personal connection to this movie and this part. >> i wanted to. it's not that i do. the guy has incredible integrity. incredible honor. i hope that i do. i aspire to be a guy like this. >> this is a real good guy. >> this is a real good guy. and sean penn's a real bad guy. not personally, but professionally. it's nice to have this shakespearean good/bad thing going. it's a different k
. secretary cohen is out there now. i came back with the following set of impressions from it. first of all, they are very concerned about what is going on in iraq. they understand about the problems of the weapons of mass destruction and the fact that they do threaten them. it is less visible, i think, than a cross border threat. second, they are fully convinced that this crisis has been created by saddam hussein. they are concerned about the iraqi people, as are we, which is why we support this oil for food plan that we wrote originally with the resolution and is now being proposed to be expanded by kofi annan. they also preferred diplomatic moves, but they also understand that should there be consequences, there will be responsible for the grave consequences. i feel confident of their support. they state they have domestic audiences and they state their support for their own purposes. i do feel that should we use force, they will be helpful to us. i think that they also understand the dangers. it is not quite the same situation as when saddam hussein invaded kuwait and there were six mon
's bring in panel defense panel. lisa cohen. fox news legal analyst. this is all the work of mayor bloomberg. also known as nanny bloomberg. he loves to tell everybody what to do. what to eat and drink because is he smarter than everybody else. has he now crossed the line. 16-ounce sugary drink is banned? >> i mean, there is really no link between the soft drink -- let's say that soft drinks. there is lots of other drinks that are sugary but aren't banned. talking about sodas. what about vitamin drinks? there is so much flaw in the ban to begin with. it really doesn't rise to the level of legitimacy for it actually to hold water. >> gregg: this law when you look at it appears to be as fickle and fictitious. for example it doesn't include grocery stores. it doesn't include convenience stores. mercedes pointed out 7/11 home of the big gup is not included. unsweetened juice, milk braced drinks. doesn't the law demand fairness in equity? >> can i see what those points, why there is a disparity between the small businesses and the larger 7/11s. if someone doesn't want to buy it. if the
cohen and kate knots, our transplant coordinators. mary grace hands sell, operating room nurse manager. jon: if you want to continue watching the news conference we'll have it streaming live on foxnews.com. doctors at john hopkins hospital in baltimore announcing they have down a double arm transplant on a very brave army soldier, brandon marrocco. he was the first american soldier to survive the loss of two arms and two legs. it happened in an ied explosion in iraq. it is an experimental surgery but doctors say he will be discharged from the hospital today after they transplanted donor arms. they hope that they will in essence take and that he will be able to gain more utility from those transplanted arms. it is a phenomenal story and he is a very brave veteran. patti ann: just incredible. right now the egyptian government is dealing with another day of violent protests. at least 52 people are dead and the head of the army is warning that the political turmoil is putting the state on the verge of collapse. president mohammed morsi declaring a state of emergency which includes a curfew
of massachusetts has selected his staff william cohen to temporarily fill kerry's u.s. senate seat. >>> outgoing secretary of state hillary clinton says she does not see herself getting back into politics. during a round of exit interviews, clinton says she will focus on public service, speaking and writing but she did not rule out a run for the white house in 2016. she says this whatever her decision, she's healthy and has a lot of energy. her last day on the job is friday. she says, though, she's looking forward to sleeping in on saturday. >>> 8:52. well, this morning, there are reports that boeing knew about problems with the batteries on its dreamliner jets before the battery fires earlier this month. all nippon said they had to change batteries on the dreamliners it owns on ten separate occasions for separate problems of. the airlines said they reported the problem to boeing. all 787s around the world were grounded after a battery fores and ana flight to make an emergency landing earlier this month. >>> and boeing a better than expected fourth-quarter earnings this month. we've been keeping
. >> reporter: new york university law school professor jerome cohen is an expert on china and a long-time friend of ai wei wei. >> i was surprised at his political activism. i worried about him. very dangerous. >> reporter: he says what really enraged the chinese government was that after the 2008 serb want earthquake that killd more than 85,000 people, ai wei wei began investigating shoddy construction. as shown in this recent documentary, he was beaten by police and had to be hospitalized. then in 2011, he was imprisoned for 81 days on allegedly trumped-up tax charges. >> reporter: he was finally released after a worldwide outcry. >> i cannot see anything. reporter: is he sort of a perpetual thorn in the side of the chinese government? >> that is an understatement. they've never seen anyone like him. normally they just lock somebody up and throw away the key. but they're afraid to do that with ai wei wei. >> reporter: though our cbs news beijing bureau was able to speak to ai wei wei this past week, he lives under constant surveillance and was not allowed to travel to the u.s. for
, like when william cohen. can you compare when william cohen was nominated as a republican by a democratic president as opposed to senator hagel? >> we've heard republicans say that chuck hagel ceased being a republican several years ago. they were concerned when he voted against -- remember, he voted against the iraq surge. he was against it. he differed from the bush administration on a number of things and i think a lot of republicans feel that he sort of left the party a while back. >> brian: jennifer griffin at the white house for a very good reason. news secretary of defense is going to be nominated today. thanks. >> gretchen: another controversial issue was general mccrystal. remember over in afghanistan he was leading the charge there and he gave an interview to the rolling stone magazine. in that, there were many revelations about how he felt about president obama and his administration. subsequently, mccrystal did resign. >> brian: i will say this, he was never quoted, criticizing the administration. others were saying that's how he felt. but he never blamed anybo
the top of this morning by mr. cohen -- the op ed by mr. cohen. we will discuss the accuracy, historical and artistically inside, but does a masterful job in suggesting in the real world there are no right angles and no easy answers to very difficult situations. that, to me, was a great service. >> i also liked the movie. it was very entertaining, but it is a movie, and there were some things i really liked and things i did not like. i did not like, for example, the portrayal of the enhanced interrogation techniques. i did not like the fact that it made a false link between torture and intelligence successes. i also think torture does not work, and our programs work because it was not tortured. there were other things i liked about the movie. i liked the fact that it conveyed that this was a 10-year marathon parian rather than a sprint -- rather than a sprint by a president, and the agency was the focus of this effort and succeeded because of the commitment, dedication, and tenacity of its people. i like the fact that it showed the enhanced interrogation program had something to do with
correspondent elizabeth cohen has a special airing tonight on "20/20," shocking medical mistakes. so when you hear that, i'm a little unnerved already. >> it is unnerving. the reason why we did this special is -- is i know so many people this has happened to, just personally. i said i've got to do a special that helps protect people because you don't hear about these things, right? you can't hear about them. >> no. >> interestingly enough a study has come out that looks at surgical mistakes and shows how often they happen. and these numbers, i'm glad you're sitting down because they are really pretty horrifying. >> brace myself? >> yes. they're pretty horrifying. i'm glad you're not having surgery any time soon. there's a study out of johns hopkins. they found that they looked at surgical tools being left inside patients. that happens 39 patients a week. surgical tools left inside. 39 patients a week. 20 patients a week have an operation on the wrong body part. so they were supposed to have their tonsils out and instead they did something else. >> the wrong leg or wrong eye or whatever it mig
that his critics have been referencing. this is from "the wall street journal." host: richard cohen weighs in in his piece in "the washington post." host: rebecca in ohio. thank you for waiting. caller: good morning. how well is he being vetting? i have watched him on tv. he is anti-semitic. i am concerned that the government does nothing for the american people. they don't have to participate in the obamacare. but they are making decisions for lives. what is theng -- regard for the american military from chuck hagel? host: what have you been watching from the former senator? caller: i watch on fox news and msnbc. it isn't just for secretary of defense. he has been a senator for a lot of years. he is not new on this page. host: her comments about how he views men and women in the military. guest: he was a prominent member on the senate foreign relations committee. i struggle with people who throw around terms saying he is anti- semitic. i do not know if most people would be comfortable saying that about chuck hagel. i think the term jewish lobby, a is a phrase he used in a quotation, use p
by the communication workers of america. the cwa. good men and women of the cwa under president larry cohen. the union for the information age. you bet. find out more about their good work at cwa-union.org. it is a friday morning. we're sort of tag teaming our way through the week here. because of my voice problem. peter ogborn, dan henning phil backert, cyprian bowlding and me, bill press. >> look at it this way. you are the rgiii of the team and i'm the kurt cousins. >> bill: my voice is about as strong as rgiii's right knee. at any rate -- >> it is a little bit better than that. >> bill: keeping us up to date here, those of us who live in our nation's capital on -- you know interesting stories let's say of the time where they happen to be taking place. local news editor and washington express columnist, clinton yates writes something called the root d.c. joining us on our news line this morning. good to you have on board. thanks. >> how is it going bill? how are you? >> bill: not too bad. >> if bill is the rgiii and i'm kurt cousins we'll call clinton the rex grossman. >> they give you that kind of
. wolf. >> elizabeth cohen with that report, thank you. >>> we can guarantee a harbaugh will coach the winning team in the super bowl. one of the best stories in the super bowl, even if the two coaches don't want to talk about it we're all having such a great year in the gulf, we've decided to put aside our rivalry. 'cause all our states are great. and now is when the gulf gets even better. the beaches and waters couldn't be more beautiful. take a boat ride or just lay in the sun. enjoy the wildlife and natural beauty. and don't forget our amazing seafood. so come to the gulf, you'll have a great time. especially in alabama. you mean mississippi. that's florida. say louisiana or there's no dessert. brought to you by bp and all of us who call the gulf home. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 after that, it's on to germany. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 then tonight, i'm trading 9500 miles away in japan. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 with the new global account from schwab, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i hunt down opportunities around the world tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 as if i'm right there. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and i'm in tot
-sector organizations and services of public policy for 16 years. peter will be followed by joshua cohen, government affairs for tax reform. he looks a mistake on the immigration position. josh is responsible for federal immigration advocacy and state budget and tax issues. he appears to have a state government affairs at the national taxpayer union and before that served as legislative assistant to alexander g environment and agricultural civil justice task force. finally, we'll hear from ray hunt salon on politics of immigration reform. he is a nonfiction writer and analyst and policy advisor for economics 21, contributing editor at national review and columnist for writers opinion in a cnn contributor. after each panel sp, we'll take questions from the audience. but for microphone before you ask your question as it is wise to do with i.q. to be up. finally, please save any protest statements in the form of a question. thanks, we'll turn it to alex. >> thank you, lori. it's a pleasure to be here tonight. this is the earliest i've been out of the office and weeks. what should a supporter of free ma
cohen to kind of explain this. i remember covering this story when he first fell into a coma and there was a lot of questions about whether or not he would be kept alive or taken off life support. what do they mean when they say he has responded to some of these things? what does that mean? >> i think they're intentionally using a vague word. it's not responding in the way that i'm responding to your question. it's not sort of that level. >> yeah. >> i spoke to a different israeli -- another israeli doctor who treated him. i'm going to quote his phrases. you have to do that in this situation. it is so specific to each individual patient. he said there was some kind of consciousness, some kind of processing was going on. that was the way he explained it. so let me give you some examples of what they did. dr. friedman sort of alluded to it a second ago. >> sure. >> they would show mr. sharon pictures of houses he wouldn't know, just random houses and theld then they would show him a picture of his own house. areas of his brain lit up that didn't light up with the random houses.
senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen. what did doctors find in this new study? >> this is fascinating. doctors autopsied hundreds of men. they found the ones who were on beta blockers, very common blood pressure medications, had fewer signs of alzheimer's in their brains. fewer lesions. less atrophy. they think it might possibly be because it's good for the brain to have lower blood pressure. it sort of takes some of the stress off the brain. maybe that's why they had those findings. >> so explain exactly what a beta blocker is. does it mean people should routinely be taking beta blockers if they suspect they could come down with dementia or alzheimer's down the road? >> beta blockers block the effect of adrenaline which is what helps bring your blood pressure down. doctors said absolutely not, you should not be on a beta blocker unless you need it. if you don't need the beta blocker, it might cause your more medical problems then you started out with. now, if you do have high blood pressure, you can ask your doctor, hey, i'd like to start on a beta blocker, le
morning. >> steve: officer cohen, let's start with you, take us back to january 10, thursday. you guys were heading back to the cop shop and you saw something alongside the road. right? >> we were heading back from one of our elementary schools because we house of representatives at risk youth. so we were heading back to our station, we saw a dog lying on the side of the road on the sidewalk. we had a real brief discussion, you know, does he look hungry? you think he looks hung flee let's go get him some food. so we went, grabbed him some food, maybe a block away, came back, 'cause his ribs were sticking out. officer lancaster attempted to feed him. when he lifted his head up, he then cried, as if he was in pain. so we looked a little closer and we realized that his left leg was swollen and he had scratches all over him. >> steve: oh, my goodness. officer lancaster, we should point out that philly now is simply asleep. philly is on the road to recovery. so you would you know up taking -- how adorable. you call him philly because you named him after a sergeant from philly. tell us a lit
. is this what america wants? joining us for debate is stephan haste and sally cohen. he had also use big words. sit along by him on "special report." do you think that president obama is trying to undo reagan's legacy? we heard him talk so much about reagan when he was running for president, how much he looked up to him what did had on his mind something like where president reagan. president obama could make liberalism safe for america. could spread the gospel progressive values just as president reagan did with conservatism. i think it's working. to the extent that he is committed to doing it i think it's working. we remain a center right country. >> charles, do you agree with charles krauthammer and stephan hayes? this seems to be the moofl president obama is making or was it there all along. >> i'm confused as to which ronald reagan we are talking about. ronald reagan was the guy who gave amnesty to millions of undocumented immigrants. raise taxes 11 times. and supported the brady gun violence bill. so there is is that ronald reagan. then there is the ronald reagan sort of fictional ronald
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